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Glenfarclas special

Part of tasting notes from a monthly private whisky club in Mumbai, India. This session is from our ‘archives’ and was a special event hosted by the Four Seasons featuring Glenfarclas.

Tasting Notes from 24 Nov 2011

Our ever evolving evenings brought our intrepid whisky sipping souls to the Four Season for a special evening with George S Grant of Glenfarclas family. For those unfamiliar with this distillery, the following story may be of interest:

“My great-great grandfather, John Grant, born in 1805, purchased Glenfarclas Distillery for £511.19s on the 8th of June 1865. To this day, Glenfarclas Single Highland Malt Scotch Whisky is distilled and matured at our family owned and run distillery, which thanks to the foresight of my forefathers remains independent. Creating a great malt whisky is a time-honoured process. Here in the heart of Speyside, my family has cherished the skills and traditions of fine malt whisky making, handing them down through six generations. We are proud to share our secrets with you”.  John L. S. Grant

We were fortunate to enjoy family tales, insights into whisky making and most importantly… tasting!

Attentively being educated on the finer points of whisky appreciation!

Attentively being educated on the finer points of whisky appreciation! (Photo: Girish Bajaj)

Our palates were teased by:

Glenfarclas 12 year 43% – A wonderfully well-rounded whisky and one well worth revisiting (plus without a scary price point!). Light gold colour, equally light nose and even palate. Slightly sweet and fruity with a soft finish. Pronounced a “fine daily sipping dram.”

Glenfarclas 105 Cask Strength 60% – Clearly a Grant family favourite. George regaled us with the tale of how this was his grandfather’s whisky of choice. With great affection, spoke of how he used to deliver a few bottles each Monday to his grandfather to imbibe and share… only to discover years later his father also did the same – just on Thursday! Wily coot or not, his grandfather had good taste on his side. Straight forward and without pretence, this is a solid, full flavoured woody whisky with just the right fruit and peatiness to have balance. Remarkably smooth with a strong finish. Like many cask strength whiskys, it opened up superbly with a dash of water.

Glenfarclas 21 year 43% – At first, it was… not as strong an offering as anticipated. However once we truly cleared our palates of its powerful cask strength cousin, the 21 year came into its own. One member tasted a touch of kokum, another spoke of almonds with a hint of nimbu tartness. The smokiness and spice were welcome.

Glenfarclas 40 year 46% – One has to wonder why the best is always left to last? While we appreciate the practice of a ‘show stopper’ in fashion, after a few drams, it is a wee bit challenging to truly appreciate something quite so fine as the 40 year. It was indeed special with a dark gold colour, nose of nuts and raisins, rich chocolaty caramel flavour and the most divine finish that lingers and leaves one wanting more!

Though our private club is fiercely independent and remains staunchly unaffiliated with any particular brand, it was a delightful evening and a distinct pleasure to imbibe in such convivial a setting.

Anyone have a Glenfarclas favourite?

For more posts on our tasting sessions and whisky explorations… check out my other blog Whisky Lady.

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3 Comments

  1. Margo says:

    Oh my, that sounds so wonderful I want to go out and buy one. The 40-yr sounds superb; the notion of keeping it so long to become so…astounding!

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